Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Volume 67 Issue 2

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March/April
2011
Volume: 67
ISSN: 1938-3282
Page count: 80
Issue external URL: Link

Interview

1 March 2011
Interview
As one who has led inspection teams in North Korea, Iraq, Syria, Libya, and other nations, Olli Heinonen says he cannot discount the possibility that a nuclear weapon will be used in the next 10 years.

Chernobyl: Looking back, moving forward

1 March 2011
Chernobyl: Looking back, moving forward
On the anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power station accident, the authors look at how public concern is increasing regarding the health consequences of radiation exposure—such concern, the authors write, is not shaped largely by fear of another Chernobyl, but by the potential use of nuclear w
1 March 2011
Europe/Russia
Chernobyl: Looking back, moving forward

The threat of global climate change has pushed governments around the world to consider alternative energy sources, including nuclear energy. As the interest in nuclear power increases, serious discussions on safety must resume before moving forward.

1 March 2011
Chernobyl: Looking back, moving forward
The author describes the experiences of Ukrainian clean-up workers, resettled families, and parents of exposed children in the decade after the 1986 Chernobyl disaster. The period was marked by a confused state response, lethal radiation doses to clean-up workers, and fragmented research efforts.
1 March 2011
Chernobyl: Looking back, moving forward
The Chernobyl accident of 1986 released vast quantities of radioactive materials and significantly contaminated about 200,000 square kilometers of land.

Feature

1 March 2011
Feature
Society’s resistance to even minor changes in our nuclear posture demonstrates that it sees little or no risk in the nuclear status quo. This article proposes using an engineering discipline known as risk analysis for determining whether society’s nuclear optimism is justified.
1 March 2011
Feature
With the debate among NATO member states over the stationing of US nuclear weapons in Europe likely to continue, it is useful to examine why some European NATO members wish to see an end to the US nuclear presence and why others stick to the status quo.

Nuclear notebook

1 March 2011
Nuclear notebook

The Obama administration’s disclosure of its stockpiled and dismantled warhead numbers through September 2009 was, apparently, a “one-time release”; thus, the question remains as to how quickly—or slowly—the country’s arsenal will decline.

Turn back the clock