Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Volume 67 Issue 3

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May/June
2011
Volume: 67
ISSN: 1938-3282
Page count: 74
Issue external URL: Link

Interview

1 May 2011
Interview
The inventor and industrialist—whose materials-science discoveries more than a half-century ago and subsequent inventions led to broad advances in photovoltaics, batteries, displays, and computer memory—describes his new efforts to develop cheaper and more efficient photovoltaic technology.

Reviewing the Review Conference: What is next for the Biological Weapons Convention?

1 May 2011
Reviewing the Review Conference: What is next for the Biological Weapons Convention?
Developments in science and technology are potentially relevant to the scope of the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC), as well as to its operation and implementation.
1 May 2011
Reviewing the Review Conference: What is next for the Biological Weapons Convention?
Central to the compliance structure of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC) are the confidence-building measures—the means by which States Parties disclose information annually.
1 May 2011
Reviewing the Review Conference: What is next for the Biological Weapons Convention?
Treaties are more than just pieces of paper. In order to fulfill the obligations set forth on paper, a vitalized process is created that can be affected both positively and negatively by the actions of those who are members and by the geopolitical context in which the treaty resides.
1 May 2011
Reviewing the Review Conference: What is next for the Biological Weapons Convention?
The central goal of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC) is, in effect, to prevent the life sciences from becoming the death sciences. The international community is now debating what steps are necessary to achieve this goal.
1 May 2011
Reviewing the Review Conference: What is next for the Biological Weapons Convention?
The Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) was negotiated as a simple treaty but its fulfillment has not been so simple: The convention has no monitoring or verification agency, no governing council, and no permanent secretariat.

Feature

1 May 2011
Feature
In 2010, South Korea’s nuclear power reactors generated 31.4 percent of the country’s total electricity—by 2030 the government plans to have 19 more reactors online, increasing even more the country’s total nuclear generating capacity.
1 May 2011
Feature
Proliferation concerns have generally been associated with the acquisition of the fissile material needed for nuclear weapons; however, the spread of the knowledge needed to build very light and powerful weapons that can be carried long distances by missiles is also a serious concern.

Nuclear notebook

1 May 2011
Nuclear notebook

With Russia’s ratification of New START in January 2011 comes a commitment to bilateral nuclear reductions. With a 2018 deadline as the goal, the treaty sets out to limit the number of deployed strategic nuclear warheads and the number of deployed ballistic missiles and heavy bombers.