Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Volume 68 Issue 1

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January
2012
Volume: 68
ISSN: 1938-3282
Page count: 98
Issue external URL: Link

Doomsday Clock issue

1 January 2012
Doomsday Clock issue
2011 was a watershed for nuclear power. In March, all eyes focused on Japan, where the world’s third severe accident at a nuclear plant unfolded.
1 January 2012
Doomsday Clock issue
If 2010 was the year of successes and landmarks for arms control, 2011 was the year that the momentum of the new era slowed, and hard realities were made apparent.
1 January 2012
Doomsday Clock issue
Yet another year passed without a biological attack, ensuring that the international community could spend its time focusing on strengthening global biosecurity measures, rather than responding to immediate threats.
1 January 2012
Doomsday Clock issue
A growing partisan divide in Congress stalled almost all new federal climate policy in 2011.
1 January 2012
Doomsday Clock issue
As the diplomatic standoff in North Korea enters its fourth year, the crisis atmosphere on the Korean peninsula sparked by Pyongyang’s military actions in 2010 has eased.

Features

1 January 2012
Features
Five scientists and engineers connected with Iran’s nuclear program have been killed or injured in recent confirmed or possible assassination attempts.
1 January 2012
Features
Space-based solar power is a system for delivering a potentially limitless supply of clean energy to a world desperately searching for alternatives to fossil fuels.
1 January 2012
Features
US–Russian nuclear arms control efforts should seek to limit not just numbers of weapons but nuclear missions as well, the most dangerous being “counterforce,” or an attack on enemy nuclear weapons before they can be launched.
1 January 2012
Features
A Fukushima-like nuclear accident does not have to be caused by nature. Similar results could be wrought by a dedicated terrorist group that gained access to a nuclear power plant and disabled its safety systems.

Nuclear notebook

1 January 2012
Nuclear notebook

In this Nuclear Notebook the authors highlight the key milestones and facts regarding the nuclear pursuits of the first five states to develop nuclear weapons—the United States, the Soviet Union and Russia, Britain, France, and China.