Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Volume 68 Issue 3

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May
2012
Volume: 68
ISSN: 1938-3282
Page count: 91
Issue external URL: Link

Special issue: Low-level radiation risks

1 May 2012
Special issue: Low-level radiation risks
1 May 2012
Special issue: Low-level radiation risks
Quantitative risk estimates from exposure to ionizing radiation are dominated by analysis of the one-time exposures received by the Japanese survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
1 May 2012
Special issue: Low-level radiation risks
Because of its scope, the Life Span Study of Japanese atomic-bomb survivors has become highly influential and widely accepted by regulators, policy makers, and courts of law.
1 May 2012
Special issue: Low-level radiation risks
The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses quantitative radiogenic cancer risk information in a number of official areas.
1 May 2012
Special issue: Low-level radiation risks
There is scientific consensus on a prevailing hypothesis that, down to near-zero levels, the occurrence of future cancer is proportional to the dose of radiation received.
1 May 2012
Special issue: Low-level radiation risks
From the atomic bomb dropped over Japan to nuclear accidents at Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, there is strong public demand for information on the cancer risks from radiation exposure.
1 May 2012
Special issue: Low-level radiation risks
Some risk events, assessed as relatively minor by technical experts, can elicit strong public concerns and result in substantial impacts on society and the economy. This is especially true in cases involving low-level radiation exposure.
1 May 2012
Special issue: Low-level radiation risks
People perceive different types of radiation risks in very different ways.
1 May 2012
Special issue: Low-level radiation risks
Causation probabilities are often a component of decisions on awarding compensation for radiation exposure and descriptions of the number of cancers caused by radiation releases.

Nuclear notebook

1 May 2012
Nuclear notebook

As of early 2012, the United States maintained an estimated 2,150 operational warheads. The arsenal is composed of roughly 1,950 strategic warheads deployed on 798 strategic delivery vehicles, as well as nearly 200 nonstrategic warheads deployed in Europe.