Month: April 2010

Nuclear exchange: RRW for CTBT?

Nuclear exchange: RRW for CTBT?

Two weeks ago, on the very day that the breakthrough in the new START arms control negotiations was announced, Ohio Republican Rep. Michael Turner posted to his website three letters from the directors of the country’s nuclear weapon laboratories expressing doubts in the viability of the programs that maintain U.S. warheads.

From nose to brain: New route for chemical incapacitation?

From nose to brain: New route for chemical incapacitation?

I first realized the power of intranasal drug delivery after reading a 2005 paper in Nature entitled “Oxytocin Increases Trust in Humans.” In it, the authors–several psychologists, neuroscientists, and economists–reported on a study based on a game that pitted two players against each other–an investor and a trustee. (You may be wondering what this has to do with oxytocin, a neuropeptide involved in mammalian social behaviour, but bear with me!) The investor has the option of donating his money to the trustee.

Strengthening nuclear security: The legal agenda

Strengthening nuclear security: The legal agenda

President Barack Obama’s upcoming Nuclear Security Summit has the potential to become a defining moment for international security in the twenty-first century, especially after the recent release of the U.S. Nuclear Posture Review. When he introduced this document, Obama said, “For the first time, preventing nuclear proliferation and nuclear terrorism is at the top of America’s nuclear agenda.”

Deconstructing U.S. funding for nuclear material security

Deconstructing U.S. funding for nuclear material security

One year ago, President Barack Obama made a bold pledge to “secure all vulnerable nuclear materials around the world within four years.” His immediate follow-through, however, has been wanting. For instance, his fiscal year 2010 budget request to meet this goal was actually $200 million less than what the Bush administration allocated a year earlier for securing nuclear material abroad. In fact, the administration still hasn’t defined what it actually considers vulnerable nuclear material. So, in essence, Obama has lost a full calendar year in his four-year quest.

This is the year for nuclear material security

This is the year for nuclear material security

A few weeks ago, an anti-nuclear group breached security fencing at the Kleine Brogel Air Base in Belgium. Undetected, the group spent more than an hour on a military base where U.S. nuclear weapons are supposedly stored. Worse yet, they then uploaded to YouTube a video showing exactly how they exploited Kleine Brogel’s security weaknesses.
Replace peace activists with terrorists and the results could be devastating.