January-Intro.jpg

Good news in technology
9 January 2018

Good news in perilous times

Because it is the keeper of the Doomsday Clock, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists is occasionally (if quite wrongly) accused of fear-mongering. The magazine, its editors, and its authors could more accurately be charged with hope-mongering, having for more than 70 years aggressively pushed the idea that humans can control the technology they create and use it for the benefit of humanity, rather than its destruction.
 
To illustrate how technologies now in relatively advanced stages of research and development really could significantly change the world for the better, the Bulletin asked top experts across a variety of relevant fields to explain the success stories they have seen around the world. Read the rest of editor-in-chief John Mecklin’s introduction to the January/February digital Journal: “Good News in Perilous Times."

Here's what you need to know:

Introduction: Good news in perilous times
John Mecklin
Free-access

New ways to detect nuclear misbehavior
Katlyn Turner

A battery of innovative choices—if we commit to investing
Noah Kittner and Daniel M. Kammen

Electric vehicles: approaching the tipping point
Daniel Sperling

The bright side of synthetic biology and Crispr
Sonia Ben Ouagrham-Gormley and Shannon Fye-Marnien

Our WMD treaties are working
Paul Meyer

Cellular agriculture: The coming revolution in food production
Carolyn S. Mattick
Free-access

Interview

Eileen Claussen: Engaging businesses on climate action
Dawn Stover

Nuclear Notebook

North Korean nuclear capabilities, 2018
Hans M. Kristensen and Robert S. Norris
Free-access

Other Features

Eliminating ICBMs—as part of a 21st-century deterrence strategy
Brent J. Talbot



Not a subscriber to the bi-monthly Journal? Click here for more information or to purchase a digital subscription. In December, The New York Times referred to Bulletin's journal as the one experts read to follow the debate about nuclear risks. We would add that the Bulletin's journal is the one experts read to follow the debate on climate change and emerging and disruptive technology, as well. Subscribe today, and be sure to follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BulletinAtomic, and on LinkedIn.