A report card on the Trump administration's approach to existential threats

 

Regardless of who occupies the White House, the most difficult challenges that the United States and other governments around the world face are dealt with over time spans counted in years, and often decades. Yet, each year of a US presidency contributes to crucial global action that cannot be squandered or reversed if nations are to successfully confront the various crises that they face. In short, US leadership matters.

In this issue, four top experts assess the Trump administration’s performance in regard to the major, continuing global threats at the heart of the Bulletin’s mission: nuclear weapons, climate change, man-made biological agents, and cyber attacks on democracy.


Here's what you need to know:

Introduction: The Trump administration’s approach to existential threat
John Mecklin
Free-access

Through a fractured looking-glass: Trump’s nuclear decisions so far
Sharon Squassoni
Free-access

Real-world headwinds for Trump climate change policy
Joseph E. Aldy
Free-access

The Trump’s administration’s misaligned approach to national biodefense
Reid Kirby
Free-access

Moving slowly, not breaking enough: Trump’s cybersecurity accomplishments
Steven Weber and Betsy Cooper

Free-access

Nuclear Notebook


A history of US nuclear weapons in South Korea
Hans M. Kristensen and Robert S. Norris
Free-access


Interviews

Free-access interview with Noam Chomsky:

Noam Chomsky: In the Trump era, severe threats to “organized human life”
Lucien Crowder                                                                                                              

Bob Inglis: A conservative for climate action
Dawn Stover


Other Features

The Chilean electricity sector confronts climate change
Camila Carrasco and Robert Rosner

Unearthing poison: Disposal of abandoned chemical weapons in China
Wanglai Gao