What's new at the Bulletin

10 April 2018

On April 14, Speak up for Science

Science enthusiasts and supporters will be joining us to speak up for science. Make sure you're one of them!

3 April 2018

John Bolton's track record

President Donald Trump's recent appointment of John Bolton as his next National Security Adviser caused a collective outcry among many in the nuclear nonproliferation community.

28 March 2018

SecDef19 to chair Board of Sponsors

Former Secretary of Defense William J. Perry to chair the Bulletin's Board of Sponsors.

21 March 2018

We're hiring!

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists is growing! We’re announcing four new support positions: Arts Initiative Coordinator, Communications Coordinator, Development Coordinator, and Grants Writer.

7 March 2018

Resilience and the climate threat, guest-edited by Alice C. Hill

In early February, the Trump administration unveiled a $1.5-trillion infrastructure plan that has received criticism on several fronts. Chief among the complaints is a lack of planning for civil and infrastructure disruptions resulting from extreme weather and a changing climate. But the Trump administration isn’t unique in this regard: studies indicate that governments around the world underinvest in infrastructure resilience by at least 70 percent. But what do we mean when we say “resilience?” And who benefits from efforts that do exist?

28 February 2018

Curbing a president's nuclear authority

Since the election of President Donald Trump, a great deal of anxiety and attention has been aimed at a US president’s authority to order the use of nuclear weapons. But policy experts who study the nuclear chain of command have long expressed concerns, with many advocating for checks on that power. Is sole authority over nuclear weapons necessary for nuclear stability?

7 February 2018

What you need to know about the Nuclear Posture Review

On February 2, the Pentagon rolled out the unclassified version of the Trump administration’s Nuclear Posture Review. The 2018 document contains significant changes over the last NPR, which was completed in 2010. The Bulletin will be publishing analyses of the NPR document itself and how it might be implemented.

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