Jerry Brown Mary Robinson Ban Ki-Moon Doomsday Clock

Join Gov. Jerry Brown (Bulletin Executive Chair), leaders of The Elders Mary Robinson (former President of Ireland) and Ban Ki-moon (former UN Secretary-General), and the Bulletin's Science and Security Board for the 2020 Doomsday Clock announcement on January 23. The event will be held at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Watch live on this page. Learn more »

From 2019: It is still 2 minutes to midnight

2019 Doomsday Clock Announcement
Washington, D.C. • January 24, 2019

Humanity now faces two simultaneous existential threats, either of which would be cause for immediate concern and attention. These major threats—nuclear weapons and climate change—were exacerbated this past year by the increased use of information warfare to undermine democracy around the world, amplifying risk from these and other threats and putting the future of civilization in extraordinary danger.

FAQ

DoomsdayClock_black_2mins_regmark.png The Bulletin has reset the minute hand on the Doomsday Clock 23 times since its debut in 1947, most recently in 2018 when we moved it from two and a half minutes to midnight to two. Every time it is reset, we’re flooded with questions about the internationally recognized symbol. Here are answers to some of the most frequent queries.

The Doomsday Clock is a design that warns the public about how close we are to destroying our world with dangerous technologies of our own making. It is a metaphor, a reminder of the perils we must address if we are to survive on the planet.

When the Doomsday Clock was created in 1947, the greatest danger to humanity came from nuclear weapons, in particular from the prospect that the United States and the Soviet Union were headed for a nuclear arms race. The Bulletin considered possible catastrophic disruptions from climate change in its hand-setting deliberations for the first time in 2007.

History of the Clock

red question mark

2020

KNOW THE TIME
• JANUARY 23 •

DoomsdayClock_black_2mins_regmark.png

2018

IT IS 2 MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT

DoomsdayClock_black_2.5mins_regmark-1

2017

IT IS TWO AND A HALF MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT

DoomsdayClock_black_3mins_regmark.jpg

2015

IT IS 3 MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT

DoomsdayClock_black_5mins_regmark

2012

IT IS 5 MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT

DoomsdayClock_black_6mins_regmark

2010

IT IS 6 MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT

FAQ

DoomsdayClock_black_2mins_regmark.png The Bulletin has reset the minute hand on the Doomsday Clock 23 times since its debut in 1947, most recently in 2018 when we moved it from two and a half minutes to midnight to two. Every time it is reset, we’re flooded with questions about the internationally recognized symbol. Here are answers to some of the most frequent queries.

The Doomsday Clock is a design that warns the public about how close we are to destroying our world with dangerous technologies of our own making. It is a metaphor, a reminder of the perils we must address if we are to survive on the planet.

When the Doomsday Clock was created in 1947, the greatest danger to humanity came from nuclear weapons, in particular from the prospect that the United States and the Soviet Union were headed for a nuclear arms race. The Bulletin considered possible catastrophic disruptions from climate change in its hand-setting deliberations for the first time in 2007.

History of the Clock

red question mark

2020

KNOW THE TIME
• JANUARY 23 •

DoomsdayClock_black_2mins_regmark.png

2018

IT IS 2 MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT

DoomsdayClock_black_2.5mins_regmark-1

2017

IT IS TWO AND A HALF MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT

DoomsdayClock_black_3mins_regmark.jpg

2015

IT IS 3 MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT