DIGITAL MAGAZINE

September 2020

DIGITAL MAGAZINE

September 2020

Cover design by Thomas Gaulkin

Introduction: Climate change action requires … actual action

Government officials and other decision-makers are the ones who will have to decide in favor of a transition away from fossil fuels, and once they have, that transition will have to be implemented and managed in the real world.

Introduction: Climate change action requires … actual action

Government officials and other decision-makers are the ones who will have to decide in favor of a transition away from fossil fuels, and once they have, that transition will have to be implemented and managed in the real world.

Over the hump: Have we really reached the peak of carbon emissions?

Have we reached peak carbon emissions—that long hoped-for moment when the global emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere stop increasing and start to decline? The answer requires a bit of context, but the answer is “quite possibly, yes.”

The climate risks of China’s Belt and Road Initiative

Evidence of the environmental harm the Chinese government wreaks beyond its borders via the Belt and Road Initiative abounds. Chinese banks are financing more than 70 percent of all coal plants outside of China, with Chinese firms constructing many of them.
peak oil demand supply fossil fuel pandemic coronavirus covid-19

However the pandemic unfolds, it’s time for oil use to peak—and society to prepare for the fallout

The enormous complexities of the pandemic’s impacts on the global petroleum system make it impossible to offer definitive answers to questions about the future of oil. But under almost any scenario, one factor deserves much more attention than it has received so far: a peak in oil demand after decades of growth.

Financing a low-carbon revolution

Imposing a price on carbon is essential for a rapid transition to a low-carbon economy, but political constraints have precluded strong action by governments. Central banks and financial regulators must step into this policy vacuum.
Shell gas station

The climate awakening of global capital

Corporations and financial giants are increasingly focused on reorienting the economy toward a zero-carbon future, and the COVID-19 pandemic has done little to deter them. And the economic case for climate action is more compelling than ever.
President Donald Trump and King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud of Saudi Arabia talk together during ceremonies, Saturday, May 20, 2017, at the Royal Court Palace in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (Official White House Photo Shealah Craighead)

Why US-Saudi Arabia relations will continue to be close, even when climate action reduces demand for oil

The defense of Saudi Arabia by the United States for the sake of oil and freedom of trade may disappear. But Saudi Arabia will still need the US to guarantee the freedom of navigation for some time to come.

Nuclear war, public health, the COVID-19 epidemic: Lessons for prevention, preparation, mitigation, and education

Dealing with a pandemic is trivial compared to dealing with the aftermath of a nuclear incident or attack. Thermal injury, followed by radiation illness, not to mention the disruption to society and the impact on the environment, would dwarf the effect of COVID-19.

Nuclear forensics: How science helps stop the trafficking of nuclear materials

If criminal drug traffickers in a relatively secure country like Australia could obtain uranium for no apparent reason, how many more radioactive materials must be out on the black market, available for purchase by the highest bidder?

Over the hump: Have we really reached the peak of carbon emissions?

Have we reached peak carbon emissions—that long hoped-for moment when the global emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere stop increasing and start to decline? The answer requires a bit of context, but the answer is “quite possibly, yes.”

The climate risks of China’s Belt and Road Initiative

Evidence of the environmental harm the Chinese government wreaks beyond its borders via the Belt and Road Initiative abounds. Chinese banks are financing more than 70 percent of all coal plants outside of China, with Chinese firms constructing many of them.
peak oil demand supply fossil fuel pandemic coronavirus covid-19

However the pandemic unfolds, it’s time for oil use to peak—and society to prepare for the fallout

The enormous complexities of the pandemic’s impacts on the global petroleum system make it impossible to offer definitive answers to questions about the future of oil. But under almost any scenario, one factor deserves much more attention than it has received so far: a peak in oil demand after decades of growth.

Financing a low-carbon revolution

Imposing a price on carbon is essential for a rapid transition to a low-carbon economy, but political constraints have precluded strong action by governments. Central banks and financial regulators must step into this policy vacuum.
Shell gas station

The climate awakening of global capital

Corporations and financial giants are increasingly focused on reorienting the economy toward a zero-carbon future, and the COVID-19 pandemic has done little to deter them. And the economic case for climate action is more compelling than ever.
President Donald Trump and King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud of Saudi Arabia talk together during ceremonies, Saturday, May 20, 2017, at the Royal Court Palace in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (Official White House Photo Shealah Craighead)

Why US-Saudi Arabia relations will continue to be close, even when climate action reduces demand for oil

The defense of Saudi Arabia by the United States for the sake of oil and freedom of trade may disappear. But Saudi Arabia will still need the US to guarantee the freedom of navigation for some time to come.

Nuclear war, public health, the COVID-19 epidemic: Lessons for prevention, preparation, mitigation, and education

Dealing with a pandemic is trivial compared to dealing with the aftermath of a nuclear incident or attack. Thermal injury, followed by radiation illness, not to mention the disruption to society and the impact on the environment, would dwarf the effect of COVID-19.

Nuclear forensics: How science helps stop the trafficking of nuclear materials

If criminal drug traffickers in a relatively secure country like Australia could obtain uranium for no apparent reason, how many more radioactive materials must be out on the black market, available for purchase by the highest bidder?

Cover design by Thomas Gaulkin

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Albert Einstein in Washington, D.C., between 1921 and 1923. Harris & Ewing, photographers. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2016885961/

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