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Pavel Podvig

Pavel Podvig

Articles by Pavel Podvig

3 May 2016

In the past few months, there have been a number of provocative events between Russia and the West: Russian jets buzz US warships in the Black Sea. Turkey, a NATO member, shoots down a Russian warplane involved in the Syria conflict.

28 April 2016
AmericasEurope/Russia

Can the US-Russia plutonium disposition agreement be saved?

Pavel Podvig

With Washington shifting tacks and Putin slinging accusations, a bilateral agreement on disposing of weapon-grade plutonium appears to be in trouble.

22 June 2015
Europe/Russia

Sorting fact from fiction on Russian missile claims

Pavel Podvig

The US says Moscow violated the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty. It should get more specific, and Russia owes a serious response.

16 January 2015
Europe/Russia

What to do about Russian belligerence

Pavel Podvig

The best way to avert future Russian aggression is not military in nature; it’s a matter of strengthening governance.

7 July 2014
AmericasEurope/Russia

How fissile material falls through the cracks

Pavel Podvig

An incident in Japan shows we’re failing to keep track of plutonium and HEU—and points to what to do about it

27 March 2014
AmericasEurope/Russia

What the Crimea crisis will do to US-Russia relations

Pavel Podvig

Cooperation on arms control and non-proliferation has survived so far, but broken ties in other areas will make it difficult to mend the relationship.

12 January 2014
AmericasEurope/Russia

No such thing as a safe nuclear arsenal

Pavel Podvig

Just because no state has detonated a warhead by accident doesn’t mean it won’t happen.

7 October 2013
Europe/RussiaMiddle East

Unexpected dangers

Pavel Podvig

Russia’s reaction to Israel’s anti-missile defense test shows that in the real world, surprise can lead to peril.

1 July 2013
Europe/Russia

A case for unilateral US nuclear warhead reductions

Pavel Podvig

If America leads, Russia will likely follow.

30 April 2013

Shooting down the Star Wars myth

Pavel Podvig

It has been 30 years since US President Ronald Reagan called for development of a missile defense system that was supposed to make nuclear weapons "impotent and obsolete." The Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) launched by Reagan's famous "Star Wars" speech in March 1983 has survived to the present day, but with ever-lower expectations. Long gone is the vision of a missile defense system that could "counter the awesome Soviet missile threat." That has been replaced with the hope that a few dozen interceptors with a spotty test record will protect the United States from an attack by a few nonexistent missiles from North Korea or Iran. What has not changed is the controversy that surrounds missile defense and its role in the nuclear age.

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