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January 2018

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Volume 74 Issue 1

Volume: 74
Page count: 59
2 January 2018

Because it is the keeper of the Doomsday Clock, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists is occasionally (if quite wrongly) accused of fear-mongering.

2 January 2018

A revolution is underway in transportation, with a variety of electric vehicles rapidly coming to the fore. The switch from internal combustion engines to electric motors will change the world in many ways and is expected to help reduce the world’s carbon dioxide emissions.

2 January 2018

Long-standing fears surrounding synthetic biology have recently been rekindled by the discovery of the gene-editing technique Crispr.

2 January 2018

If we had the technology to detect nuclear materials remotely it could help deter smuggling and make it easier to monitor international nuclear agreements. Several recent breakthroughs, if followed up with continued research and funding, could deliver on this promise.

2 January 2018

As new technologies change the face of war, whether and how to pursue arms-control and disarmament treaties is an urgent question. Our past treaties show us that codified commitments can have an influence on state conduct.

2 January 2018

Cellular agriculture is a nascent technology that allows meat and other agricultural products to be cultured from cells in a bioreactor rather than harvested from livestock on a farm.

2 January 2018

The United States, if it follows through on plans to modernize all three legs of its nuclear triad, would perpetuate a Cold War deterrence structure inappropriate to contemporary threats.

2 January 2018

Renewable energy – such as photovoltaics and wind power – is rapidly moving into the mainstream, with global solar capacity set to outproduce nuclear energy capacity for the first time.

Interview

2 January 2018
Interview

In this interview, American climate and energy expert Eileen Claussen talks about both the promise and the limitations of corporate action to address climate change. Read this new interview in the latest issue of our digi