DIGITAL MAGAZINE

May 2022

DIGITAL MAGAZINE

May 2022

Cover by Thomas Gaulkin. Photo via Stand.earth.

fire closeup

Introduction: Can we grow and burn our way out of climate change?

When it comes to deciding whether biomass burning is good for the climate, the devil is in the details—and there are a lot of possible devils lurking in these particular details.
fire closeup

Introduction: Can we grow and burn our way out of climate change?

When it comes to deciding whether biomass burning is good for the climate, the devil is in the details—and there are a lot of possible devils lurking in these particular details.
conifers and mist

Plant power: Burning biomass instead of coal can help fight climate change—but only if done right

Burning wood at electrical generating facilities instead of fossil fuel could help fight global warming—at least in theory. But it’s far from a black-and-white issue in practice; it’s time to take a measured look at all the shades of grey.
wood pellets burning, logs in background

Does wood bioenergy help or harm the climate?

To avoid the worst harms from climate change we must not only keep the vast majority of remaining fossil carbon in the ground, but must also keep the vast majority of the carbon in forests on the land.
clearcut in British Columbia

“Sustainable biomass”— A paper tiger when it comes to reducing carbon emissions

Burning trees and other forest biomass emits more carbon pollution than burning fossil fuels. Policymakers should protect forests, not burn them for energy.
Drax wood-fired power plant

Burning biomass: a Drax-tic idea, and bad for environmental justice

While energy sources such as biomass are being marketed as lower-carbon alternatives, concerns about environmental justice, biodiversity, and the protection of our natural resources are at risk of being shunted aside.
coal smoke from steel mill, China

When burning wood to generate energy makes climate sense

At the heart of the wood energy controversy is the question of whether it ever truly makes climate sense to substitute biomass for fossil fuels, as Drax did. Our work has shown that the answer is a resounding “it depends.”
seedling

Wood-burning: carbon hero or carbon villain? Q&A with forest modeling scientist Michael Ter-Mikaelian

There are many problems to finding out if burning wood in place of fossil fuel makes sense as a way of fighting climate change, says one researcher.

Nuclear Notebook: How many nuclear weapons does the United States have in 2022?

This Nuclear Notebook examines the status of the US nuclear arsenal, which remained roughly unchanged in the last year, with the Defense Department maintaining an estimated stockpile of approximately 3,708 warheads. Of these, only about 1,744 warheads are deployed, while approximately 1,964 are held in reserve. Additionally, approximately 1,720 retired warheads are awaiting dismantlement, giving a total inventory of approximately 5,428 nuclear warheads. Of the approximately 1,744 warheads that are deployed, 400 are on landbased intercontinental ballistic missiles, roughly 944 are on submarine-launched ballistic missiles, 300 are at bomber bases in the United States, and 100 tactical bombs are at European bases.
conifers and mist

Plant power: Burning biomass instead of coal can help fight climate change—but only if done right

Burning wood at electrical generating facilities instead of fossil fuel could help fight global warming—at least in theory. But it’s far from a black-and-white issue in practice; it’s time to take a measured look at all the shades of grey.
wood pellets burning, logs in background

Does wood bioenergy help or harm the climate?

To avoid the worst harms from climate change we must not only keep the vast majority of remaining fossil carbon in the ground, but must also keep the vast majority of the carbon in forests on the land.
clearcut in British Columbia

“Sustainable biomass”— A paper tiger when it comes to reducing carbon emissions

Burning trees and other forest biomass emits more carbon pollution than burning fossil fuels. Policymakers should protect forests, not burn them for energy.
Drax wood-fired power plant

Burning biomass: a Drax-tic idea, and bad for environmental justice

While energy sources such as biomass are being marketed as lower-carbon alternatives, concerns about environmental justice, biodiversity, and the protection of our natural resources are at risk of being shunted aside.
coal smoke from steel mill, China

When burning wood to generate energy makes climate sense

At the heart of the wood energy controversy is the question of whether it ever truly makes climate sense to substitute biomass for fossil fuels, as Drax did. Our work has shown that the answer is a resounding “it depends.”
seedling

Wood-burning: carbon hero or carbon villain? Q&A with forest modeling scientist Michael Ter-Mikaelian

There are many problems to finding out if burning wood in place of fossil fuel makes sense as a way of fighting climate change, says one researcher.

Nuclear Notebook: How many nuclear weapons does the United States have in 2022?

This Nuclear Notebook examines the status of the US nuclear arsenal, which remained roughly unchanged in the last year, with the Defense Department maintaining an estimated stockpile of approximately 3,708 warheads. Of these, only about 1,744 warheads are deployed, while approximately 1,964 are held in reserve. Additionally, approximately 1,720 retired warheads are awaiting dismantlement, giving a total inventory of approximately 5,428 nuclear warheads. Of the approximately 1,744 warheads that are deployed, 400 are on landbased intercontinental ballistic missiles, roughly 944 are on submarine-launched ballistic missiles, 300 are at bomber bases in the United States, and 100 tactical bombs are at European bases.

Cover by Thomas Gaulkin. Photo via Stand.earth.

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