DIGITAL MAGAZINE

November 2022

DIGITAL MAGAZINE

November 2022

Cover by Thomas Gaulkin

Russian honor guard

Introduction—Russia: What to expect next?

Churchill once famously described Russia as “a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma.” But he also said that there may be a key to understanding it.
Russian honor guard

Introduction—Russia: What to expect next?

Churchill once famously described Russia as “a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma.” But he also said that there may be a key to understanding it.
Vladimir Putin

After Putin – What?

Like all humans, Putin will inevitably expire someday. When that day arrives, it's uncertain what the future of Russia will be: Will it necessarily collapse? Or will Putin’s successor turn to the West and engage the country in reforms and modernization? Or has Putin already ensured that whoever happens to be his successor will be locked in to staying the current course?
Lukoil refinery

Russia’s economy is much more than a “big gas station.” Under sanctions, that’s now its biggest problem.

Ironically, by sanctioning Russia, the West may actually make that country into a true petrostate that is dependent on a handful of extractive industries—making today’s caricature of Russia come true in the near future.
soldier with gas mask

Putin’s psychology and nuclear weapons: the fundamentalist mindset

Vladimir Putin’s recent threats to use nuclear weapons are grounded in a psychology that is paranoid and also millennialist—focused on an imagined future that will come only after the “good” have vanquished the evil “others.” In Putin’s worldview, the profound humiliation that he believes the West has inflicted on his sense of self, both an individual and as a member of the Russian people, is an intolerable injury that must be avenged.
St Basil's cathedral, Red Square, Moscow

What do ordinary Russians think? Interview with a Russian independent reporter

What is the pulse of Russia today among average, everyday Russians?
Fiery Cross Reef Chinese military base

Not your grandparents’ Cold War: Why America should emphasize economic rather than military strategies in its rivalry with China

Why America should emphasize economic rather than military strategies in its rivalry with China.
Francis Fukuyama portrait on Stanford campus

“It’s a different kind of world we’re living in now”—Interview with political scientist Francis Fukuyama

There’s a lot of authoritarian governments on the move, and they’re consolidating power. But over the long term, things look brighter—if we have the willpower, says the author of the 1990s bestseller “The End of History."
Lake Como

Sanctioning Russia’s oligarchs—with shame

The last few months have brought a different sanctions strategy to the fore: one aimed at stigmatizing the individuals close to Putin’s regime, in hopes of shattering elite support and encouraging revolt. These sanctions, which have led to freezing and seizures of Russian oligarchs’ assets in the West, have prompted the first murmurs of public dissent by Russian oligarchs in nearly two decades.
prototype of Russia's new Poseidon nuclear torpedo

Despite challenges, US-Russian nuclear arms control has its benefits

New START expires in less than four years, which isn’t much time to put a replacement arms control arrangement in place. But divisive though the talks will inevitably be, the US and Russia can still reach agreement on crucial issues of concern, such as the new nuclear weapon delivery systems unveiled by Russia in 2018-2019.
Putin at 20-foot long table with Macron

Distressing a system in distress: Global nuclear order and Russia’s war against Ukraine

Russia’s use of nuclear threats as a shield and enabler for its war goes well beyond its declared nuclear doctrine.
night-time test launch of Minuteman ICBM with silhouettes of crowd

Nuclear Notebook: The long view—Strategic arms control after the New START Treaty

This Nuclear Notebook examines the topic of strategic arms control after the expiration of the New START Treaty in February 2026.
Vladimir Putin

After Putin – What?

Like all humans, Putin will inevitably expire someday. When that day arrives, it's uncertain what the future of Russia will be: Will it necessarily collapse? Or will Putin’s successor turn to the West and engage the country in reforms and modernization? Or has Putin already ensured that whoever happens to be his successor will be locked in to staying the current course?
Lukoil refinery

Russia’s economy is much more than a “big gas station.” Under sanctions, that’s now its biggest problem.

Ironically, by sanctioning Russia, the West may actually make that country into a true petrostate that is dependent on a handful of extractive industries—making today’s caricature of Russia come true in the near future.
soldier with gas mask

Putin’s psychology and nuclear weapons: the fundamentalist mindset

Vladimir Putin’s recent threats to use nuclear weapons are grounded in a psychology that is paranoid and also millennialist—focused on an imagined future that will come only after the “good” have vanquished the evil “others.” In Putin’s worldview, the profound humiliation that he believes the West has inflicted on his sense of self, both an individual and as a member of the Russian people, is an intolerable injury that must be avenged.
St Basil's cathedral, Red Square, Moscow

What do ordinary Russians think? Interview with a Russian independent reporter

What is the pulse of Russia today among average, everyday Russians?
Fiery Cross Reef Chinese military base

Not your grandparents’ Cold War: Why America should emphasize economic rather than military strategies in its rivalry with China

Why America should emphasize economic rather than military strategies in its rivalry with China.
Francis Fukuyama portrait on Stanford campus

“It’s a different kind of world we’re living in now”—Interview with political scientist Francis Fukuyama

There’s a lot of authoritarian governments on the move, and they’re consolidating power. But over the long term, things look brighter—if we have the willpower, says the author of the 1990s bestseller “The End of History."
Lake Como

Sanctioning Russia’s oligarchs—with shame

The last few months have brought a different sanctions strategy to the fore: one aimed at stigmatizing the individuals close to Putin’s regime, in hopes of shattering elite support and encouraging revolt. These sanctions, which have led to freezing and seizures of Russian oligarchs’ assets in the West, have prompted the first murmurs of public dissent by Russian oligarchs in nearly two decades.
prototype of Russia's new Poseidon nuclear torpedo

Despite challenges, US-Russian nuclear arms control has its benefits

New START expires in less than four years, which isn’t much time to put a replacement arms control arrangement in place. But divisive though the talks will inevitably be, the US and Russia can still reach agreement on crucial issues of concern, such as the new nuclear weapon delivery systems unveiled by Russia in 2018-2019.
Putin at 20-foot long table with Macron

Distressing a system in distress: Global nuclear order and Russia’s war against Ukraine

Russia’s use of nuclear threats as a shield and enabler for its war goes well beyond its declared nuclear doctrine.
night-time test launch of Minuteman ICBM with silhouettes of crowd

Nuclear Notebook: The long view—Strategic arms control after the New START Treaty

This Nuclear Notebook examines the topic of strategic arms control after the expiration of the New START Treaty in February 2026.

Cover by Thomas Gaulkin

Subscribe Now

We've relaunched the Bulletin's award-winning digital magazine. Get premium access for less than $5 a month.

Magazine archive

cover image for July 2022 magazine issue on blockchain and cryptocurrency with image of giant bitcoin melting on to the planet Earth
cover image for July 2022 magazine issue on blockchain and cryptocurrency with image of giant bitcoin melting on to the planet Earth
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists March 2021 magazine issue cover
Albert Einstein in Washington, D.C., between 1921 and 1923. Harris & Ewing, photographers. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. https://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2016885961/

Premium subscribers can read the complete Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists’ archive, which contains every article published since our founding in 1945.

This archive was created in honor of John A. Simpson, one of the Bulletin’s principal founders and a longtime member of its Board of Sponsors. This searchable archive provides exclusive online access to original interviews and commentary by luminaries like Albert Einstein, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Ruth Adams, John F. Kennedy, Stephen Hawking, Christine Todd Whitman, US Secretary of Defense William J. Perry, and multiple Nobel laureates.