Examples of Russian social media disinformation featuring Black people made available by the US House of Representatives. Credit: US House of Representatives Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.

Alan Miller: How the News Literacy Project teaches schoolchildren (and adults) to dismiss and debunk internet disinformation

By John Mecklin, May 13, 2021

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Examples of Russian social media disinformation featuring Black people made available by the US House of Representatives. Credit: US House of Representatives Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.

Editor’s note: Want to hear more from Alan Miller? Register here for our June 23 virtual program.

Internet-based disinformation did not originate, by any means, in the Trump administration, but the 2016 US presidential campaign marked a turning point of sorts. A presidential candidate actively sought to blur the line between truth and evidence-challenged assertion and, once in office, continued prevaricating for four years about matters large and small.

As the coronavirus crisis shows, we need science now more than ever.

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